It is no secret that a criminal conviction usually carries some serious consequences. For example, if you are facing a domestic violence charge in Fort Lauderdale, in addition to a restraining order, you could also have to spend time incarcerated and pay expensive fines and court fees. Like with any criminal offense, the extent of the penalties is going to depend on the severity of the crime and the specific details surrounding the incident.

During the sentencing process in Florida, the court can impose a wide variety of penalties as a result of a conviction. Here are a few consequences you might suffer if a court finds you guilty of a criminal act.

Probation

Even if you do not spend any time in jail, you might have to serve probation. Depending on the circumstances of your case, probation could last anywhere from one day to several years. During the probation period, your freedoms and liberties could be very limited. For instance, the court may not allow you to travel outside the county while you are on probation. In addition, you will have to regularly report to a probation officer and possibly attend some kind of program that directly relates to the charges.

Community service

Another common penalty that courts typically impose is community service. This is usually reserved for low level crimes or for first-time offenders. Sometimes community service is a condition of probation. Community service is not limited to picking up garbage off the side of the road. If the court assigns you community service, you might spend it working with a charitable or religious organization.

Other restrictions

A criminal conviction could also carry other restrictions. For example, if you were convicted of domestic violence, you may be limited to only supervised visits with your children. A drunk driving conviction could lead to a suspended license. The restrictions you face will usually have a direct correlation to the criminal charges.

If you are facing criminal charges in Fort Lauderdale, the above penalties could be in your future if the court convicts you. However, with a strong defense, you might be able to win your case and avoid a conviction on your record.

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